December 29, 2018

Community_health_worker_gives_a_vaccination_in_Odisha_state_India_8380317750

2018-12-29 00:00:00 India Development Review Community_health_worker_gives_a_vaccination_in_Odisha_state_India_8380317750
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Thanks to the Government of Odisha's commitment and support from the UK, mums-to-be and new mums can now get advice and support from day one in every village. Support now starts well before a baby's due date, and continues until their first birthday. Community health worker, Rebati, gives babies like Adilya, polio and other life saving vaccinations for at least the first year of their lives. Britain is  working with the Government of Odisha, one of India's poorest states, and UNICEF to save the lives of thousands of mums and babies., Babies born in the poorer states of India – a country where more people live in poverty than the whole of Africa – now have a better chance of surviving than ever before. 

Thanks to the Government of Odisha's commitment and support from the UK, mums-to-be and new mums can get advice and support from day one in every village. 

Vital ante and post-natal care that helps mums bring their babies into the world safe and well.

See how community health workers, nurses, soap opera stars and granny self help groups are together helping save the lives of thousands of babies in our gallery.

UPDATE, June 2012: In 2011-12, 150,000 children like Baby Sethy have been delivered safely in India with the help of skilled birth attendants thanks to support from Britain. And across the world's poorest countries, UK aid has made sure half a million mums had the help of skilled doctors and nurses to have their babies in the last two years.

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The Government of Odisha is working with the UK Government to improve health services, support community health workers and increase take up from families in every village - helping to save the lives of thousands of mums and babies. 

Britain is supporting the governments of three of India's poorer states (Odisha, Bihar and Madhya Pradesh) and UNICEF to bring healthcare to everyone, especially the poorest and most disadvantaged. 

All pictures © Pippa Ranger / Department for International Development  

For more information, visit www.dfid.gov.uk/changinglives

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